Category Archives: External goods

Sen. Al Franken to address Atlanta Joint Mathematics Mtg

al_franken_official_senate_portrait

The AMS Committee on Science Policy (CSP) will be hosting a panel discussion at next month’s Joint Mathematics Meeting in Atlanta.  Karen Saxe, who worked for Senator Al Franken as the 2013-2014 AMS/AAAS Science and Technology Policy Congressional Fellow, invited the Minnesota Senator (and former Saturday Night Live cast member) to speak to the panel, and he obliged by sending a video to be played at the meeting.  Here is the full CSP panel program:

AMS Committee on Science Policy Panel Discussion 

Friday, January 6, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

Place:              Atlanta Marriott Marquise, Atrium Level, Room A704   

Title:                “Grassroots Advocacy for Mathematics and Science Policy”

Organizers:      Jeffrey Hakim, American University (jhakim@american.edu )
Douglas Mupasiri, University of Northern Iowa (douglas.mupasiri@uni.edu )
Scott Wolpert, University of Maryland (saw@math.umd.edu )

Moderator:      Karen Saxe (kxs@ams.org), Director, AMS Washington Office

Panelists:         Catherine Paolucci, Office of Senator Al Franken (paoluccic@gmail.com)

Douglas Mupasiri, University of Northern Iowa (douglas.mupasiri@uni.edu)

Scott Wolpert, University of Maryland (saw@math.umd.edu)

Description:     The AMS Committee on Science Policy has organized this panel to discuss ways to engage with elected officials in addressing policy issues of concern to the mathematics community, including research funding and education.  Panelists will discuss the importance of grassroots advocacy and building relationships with legislators to further goals.

The video is about three minutes long, and those of you who cannot attend will be able to watch it at the AMS website — details to be supplied later.   In the meantime, if you’re wondering what “Grassroots advocacy for mathematics” looks like, Karen directed me to this blog post about a recent (Capitol) Hill Visit by a Villanova student delegation, organized by the Association for Women in Mathematics.

Speaking of Washington, I found the following quotation from Nietzsche’s Transvaluation of all Values in the chapter on Sade and Nietzsche of Horkheimer and Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment:

The weak and unsuccessful must perish; this is the first proposition of our philanthropy.  And they should even be helped on their way.

Also this quotation from Sade’s Justine:

How in truth can  you require that he who has been endowed by nature with an eminent capacity for crime… should have to obey the same law that calls all to virtue or to moderation?

If these sentiments remind you of individuals, living or dead, who have been mentioned in the news recently, you will be relieved to see that, more than one month after national elections, the officials entrusted with the business of the Republic appear not to be guided by Sadist ethics.

 

Urgent news from Leicester

Tim Gowers has once again done the university community a great service by using his blog to publicize the impending decimation of the University of Leicester’s mathematics department.  More like a double decimation:  of the department’s 23 full-time staff, 5 are slated to lose their jobs, with the research staff shrinking by close to 30%.  Rather than repeat the details, which you can find presented with Gowers’s customary clarity on his blog, I am using this space to encourage readers and their friends to sign the protest petition.  The petition already has over 2500 signatures, many of them alerted to the situation (as I was) by reading Gowers’s account.

Leicester is being cut back across the board, but the cuts in mathematics are particularly severe.  For a crash course in the neo-liberal conception of the university, you can read the relevant chapter in Wendy Brown’s Undoing the Demos, featured in an entry on this blog last year.

This blog has been suspended but it will be revived occasionally for urgent news items like this one.

UPDATE:  Vladimir Tasić points out that this sort of thing is happening with increasing frequency in Canada as well.

 

Four scientific societies react to the resignation of French experts

I am told that the previous post on the resignation of the ANR evaluation committee for mathematics and computer science was widely shared on Facebook, notably by researchers in the social sciences.  Today the Société Mathématique de France published a joint statement signed by the presidents of four professional organizations, as well as the text of a motion in support of the resignation, voted by the SMF at their national meeting last week.

The joint statement is reproduced below (in French).

Déclaration des sociétés savantes françaises de mathématiques et d’informatique

Société Française de Statistique (SFdS),

Société de Mathématiques Appliquées et Industrielles (SMAI),

Société Mathématique de France (SMF),

Société Informatique de France (SIF).

Mise  en  garde  sur  l’inadéquation  du  modèle  de  sélection  de  l’ANR  pour  les mathématiques et l’informatique.

Les sociétés savantes de mathématiques, statistique et informatique (SFdS, SMAI, SMF, SIF) alertent  les  pouvoirs  publics,  l’Agence  Nationale de  la  Recherche  (ANR)  et  la  communauté scientifique  sur  la  démobilisation  massive  des  mathématiciens  et  informaticiens  constaté  ces dernières années dans les appels à projets de l’ANR.

Cette démobilisation  apparaît comme une conséquence  du choix de l’ANR de ne pas tenir  compte  des  spécificités  disciplinaires  et  de  ne  pas  impulser  une  dynamique  qui soit réellement au service du développement de la science et de l’innovation en France.

Les  mathématiques,  les  statistiques  et  l’informatique  sont  fortement  moteurs  et  vont l’être  de  plus  en  plus  de  façon  directe,  transversale  et  interdisciplinaire  dans  tous  les changements  en  cours  concernant  le  développement  technologique,  les  enjeux  du numérique  et  la  capacité  d’innovation  en  France  et  à  l’international.  Pourtant,  le conseil  de  prospective  de  l’ANR  n’intègre  aucun  mathématicien  ni  informaticien  en son sein.

Le  Comité  d’Evaluation  Scientifique  de  l’ANR  en  mathématiques  et  informatique (CES 40) a  constaté  une  forte  baisse  du  nombre  de  projets  soumis  en  2016, conséquence immédiate d’une perte de la motivation des  collègues face au très faible  taux  d’acceptation  des  années  précédentes.  Il  souligne    également  la difficulté  de  mobiliser  les  collègues  pour  expertiser  des  projets  trop  souvent rejetés.

Or le nombre de projets soutenus est calculé par l’ANR proportionnellement au nombre de projets soumis. Cette année, nos deux disciplines auront donc encore moins  de  projets  acceptés,  amorçant  un cercle  vicieux  qui  met  en  danger  la vitalité de nos communautés.

En outre, les modalités d’élaboration du taux d’acceptation de l’ANR ne sont pas discutées  de  façon  ouverte  ni  diffusées  à  la  communauté  scientifique  (toutes disciplines  confondues).  Ce  taux est  déterminé  par  l’ANR,  de  façon  opaque  et  sans   aucune   concertation   avec   les   comités   après   leur   travail   d’évaluation scientifique. Il est fixé pour chaque défi, sans aucune considération disciplinaire qui permettrait  de  dégager  une  vision  pour  le  développement  de  la  science  et leur impact économique et sociétal. Les comités doivent aujourd’hui travailler en «aveugle», sans aucune information sur la politique de répartition des moyens, et sans prise en compte des critères scientifiques pour le classement final.

Les quatre sociétés savantes signataires  demandent donc que les comités scientifiques soient pleinement associés aux modalités d’élaboration des taux d’acceptation, qu’une enveloppe budgétaire soit décidée en amont du travail des comités et que le conseil de prospective de l’ANR soit plus représentatif pour les mathématiques et l’informatique. Porteuses  des  attentes  de  leur  communauté,  elles  souhaitent  rencontrer  le  ministère dans les plus brefs délais.

GÉRARD    BIAU,    Président    de    la    SFdS,

FATIHA    ALABAU,    Présidente    de    la    SMAI,

MARC    PEIGNE,    Président    de    la    SMF,

JEAN-­MARC    PETIT,    Président    de    la    SIF.

French expert committee resigns in protest

The members of the French Scientific Evaluation Committee in mathematics and computer science (CES 40) resigned unanimously on June 1 to protest “the confiscation of scientific choices by a purely administrative [i.e., bureaucratic] management.”

The role of the CES 40, and of similar committees in other disciplines, is to evaluate research proposals submitted to the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), which then decides which projects to fund.  The ANR (not to be confused with absolute neighborhood retract) was created in 2005 in emulation of the NSF, in order to shift priorities from long-term funding of laboratories and research teams to short-term funding of specific projects, “in a context of budgetary constraints [i.e. austerity],” according to Wikipedia.  Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy (currently under investigation for illegal campaign funding) explained the motivations of the move with his characteristic disdain for the scientific community:

Je souhaite qu’à cette nouvelle génération soit inculqué non plus le réflexe du financement récurrent mais la culture du financement sur projet, la culture de l’excellence, la culture de l’évaluation.

The text of the protest letter is copied below, and can also be read here, with comments, as well as on the website of the Société Mathématique de France.

Le Comité d’Evaluation Scientifique en mathématiques et en informatique de l’Agence Nationale de la Recherche démissionne en bloc pour protester contre la confiscation des choix scientifiques par une gestion entièrement administrative

Le 1er juin, à l’issue de trois jours d’évaluation scientifique, le comité en mathématiques et en informatique (CES 40) a décidé unanimement de ne pas transmettre ses conclusions à l’ANR. Ses membres refusent de servir de caution scientifique et déclineront toute sollicitation ultérieure de l’ANR dans les conditions actuelles.

Le comité conteste l’opacité du processus de sélection. A ce jour, le nombre de projets financés est déterminé en proportion du nombre de projets soumis, sans que les comités aient la maîtrise du seuil d’acceptation, ou la connaissance de l’enveloppe budgétaire attribuée. Or, loin d’être uniquement des informations financières ou administratives, ce sont des éléments scientifiques essentiels sans lesquels les comités ne peuvent élaborer une proposition cohérente.

L’addition des contraintes budgétaire et administrative conduit mécaniquement à un taux d’acceptation trop faible pour être incitatif. Or, la constitution d’un dossier de qualité exige un temps important, que de moins en moins de collègues accepteront d’investir au vu du taux de succès qui a cours. Cela s’est traduit par une diminution de plus de 20% du nombre de projets soumis dans le CES 40 qui entraîne à son tour une baisse du nombre de projets financés. L’ANR manque donc l’occasion de soutenir un nombre important de projets à fort impact.

Le comité s’inquiète aussi de la perte annoncée de son indépendance, puisque son président sera désormais employé par l’ANR.

Les membres du comité demandent à la direction générale de l’ANR la mise en place un nouveau mode de fonctionnement. Ils souhaitent un meilleur contrôle du processus de sélection, de manière à mettre en œuvre une politique scientifique cohérente qui respecte les spécificités de chaque discipline, au service de la stratégie nationale de la recherche.

Les membres du CES 40, unanimes :
– Christophe BESSE, Président du CES 40, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université Toulouse 3
– Marie-Claude ARNAUD, Vice-Présidente du CES 40, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université d’Avignon
– Max DAUCHET, Vice-Président du CES 40, Professeur émérite d’Informatique, Université Lille 1
– Mourad BELLASSOUED,  Professeur de Mathématiques, Université de Tunis El Manar
– Oliver BOURNEZ, Professeur d’Informatique, Ecole Polytechnique
– Frédéric CHAZAL, Directeur de Recherche en Informatique, INRIA Saclay
– Johanne COHEN,  Chargée de Recherches en Informatique, CNRS, Université Paris Sud
– François DENIS, Professeur d’Informatique, Université Aix-Marseille
– Bruno DESPRES, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université Paris 6
– Arnaud DURAND, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université Paris Diderot
– Alessandra FRABETTI, Maître de Conférence en Mathématiques, Université Lyon 1
– Jin Kao HAO, Professeur d’Informatique, Université d’Angers
– Tony LELIEVRE, Professeur de Mathématiques, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech
– Mathieu LEWIN, Directeur de Recherche en Mathématiques, CNRS, Université Paris Dauphine
– Gaël MEIGNIEZ, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université Bretagne Sud
– Sophie MERCIER, Professeur de Mathématiques, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour
– Johannes NICAISE, Professeur de Mathématiques, Imperial College Londres
– Lhouari NOURINE, Professeur d’Informatique, Université Blaise Pascal
– Jean-Michel ROQUEJOFFRE,  Professeur de Mathématiques, Université Toulouse 3
– Alessandra SARTI,  Professeur de Mathématiques, Université de Poitiers

French research budgets cut 134,000,000 €, reaction in Le Monde

From today’s Le Monde.   Cédric Villani’s signature at the bottom.

Un projet de décret a été présenté commission des finances de l’Assemblée nationale, mercredi 18 mai, annulant 256 millions d’euros de crédits sur la mission « recherche et enseignement supérieur ». La commission doit se prononcer sur ce texte mardi. Dans une tribune, publiée par « Le Monde », sept Prix Nobel et une médaille Fields (une récompense équivalente pour les mathématiques), dénoncent « un coup de massue » et décrivent des mesures qui « s’apparentent à un suicide scientifique et industriel ».

 

Hasards de l’actualité : nous avons appris le même jour que les dépenses de recherche et développement (R&D) de l’Etat fédéral allemand ont augmenté de 75 % en dix ans, et que le gouvernement français annulait 256 millions d’euros des crédits 2016 de la Mission recherche enseignement supérieur (Mires), représentant un quart des économies nécessaires pour financer les dépenses nouvelles annoncées depuis janvier.

Au sein de ces mesures, on note que les principaux organismes de recherche sont particulièrement touchés, le CEA, le CNRS, l’INRA et Inria, pour une annulation globale de 134 millions d’euros.

Nous savons combien les budgets de ces organismes sont tendus depuis de longues années. Ce coup de massue vient confirmer les craintes régulièrement exprimées : la recherche scientifique française, dont le gouvernement ne cesse par ailleurs de louer la grande qualité et son apport à la R&D, est menacée de décrochage vis-à-vis de ses principaux concurrents dans l’espace mondialisé et hautement compétitif de la recherche scientifique. Exemple parmi d’autres, le gouvernement américain vient de décider de doubler son effort dans le domaine des recherches sur l’énergie.

Ce coup d’arrêt laissera des traces, et pour de longues années

Ce que l’on détruit brutalement, d’un simple trait de plume budgétaire, ne se reconstruit pas en un jour. Les organismes nationaux de recherche vont devoirarrêter des opérations en cours et notamment limiter les embauches de chercheurs et de personnels techniques. Ce coup d’arrêt laissera des traces, et pour de longues années.

Le message envoyé par le gouvernement n’incitera pas non plus la jeunesse à se tourner vers les métiers de la recherche scientifique et de la R&D en général.

Une analyse récente de la société Thomson Reuters plaçait trois organismes français, le CEA, le CNRS et l’Inserm, parmi les dix organismes publics les plus innovants au monde, illustrant ainsi le fait que notre pays dispose bien de la recherche de base et d’une R&D de qualité, conditions nécessaires pour mener à bien le redressement économique du pays.

Nous sommes encore loin des 3 % du PIB fixés comme objectif pour les dépenses de R&D par la stratégie Europe 2020, et nous n’y parviendrons pas en fragilisant à ce point les principaux organismes de recherche. Les mesures qui viennent d’être prises s’apparentent à un suicide scientifique et industriel.

Dans ce monde incertain, la qualité de notre recherche est un atout considérable. La recherche française est un des pôles reconnus de la science mondiale multipolaire et nous devons maintenir et consolider cette position enviable. Car il n’y a pas de nation prospère sans une recherche scientifique de qualité. Puisse le gouvernement français entendre cet appel.

Google’s translation is comprehensible.  Signed by

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (Prix Nobel de physiologie ou médecine)
Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (Prix Nobel de physique)
Albert Fert (Prix Nobel de physique)
Serge Haroche (Prix Nobel de physique)
Jules Hoffmann (Prix Nobel de physiologie ou médecine)
Jean Jouzel (vice-président du groupe scientifique du GIEC, au moment où celui-ci reçoit le prix Nobel de la paix)
Jean-Marie Lehn (Prix Nobel de chimie)
Cédric Villani (médaille Fields)

The belief that there are natural laws of finance

I continue the discussion of Frédéric Lordon’s Jusqu’à quand, which contains an explanation of the practices that made the 2008 crash inevitable that has yet to be translated into English although it is more specific and complete than Margot Robbie in a bubble bath or celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain making fish stew.  Here is a quotation that grapples directly with the most dangerous of the many illusions promoted by the manufacturers of mathematical models, namely that the objectivity of such models can be separated not only from the empirical observations needed to confirm and perfect them but also from need for a conceptual framework in which the question of the model’s objectivity can be raised.   Lordon argues that quantitative (probabilistic) models of finance are meaningless if there is no reason to believe that finance is governed by natural laws:

Obviously the most devoted partisans of quantitative finance will argue that any imperfection is transitory and remind us how the development of science is progressive but irresistible; even if today’s models still make a few mistakes, there is no problem that won’t eventually give way to hard work and research.  There are nevertheless reasons to think that this optimism will come up against a fundamental and insurmountable obstacle, rooted in the very question of knowing whether it is possible, and if so how far, to grasp financial risk through the calculus of probabilities.    Transcribing risk in the language of probability is such a common practice that it is never called into question.  The modelers, who consider the question trivial, are thus barely aware of the — absolutely non-trivial — theoretical choices they undertake when they make the hypothesis that the prices of financial assets are governed by this or that probabilistic law. … Of all the tools offered by the calculus of probability, the so-called “Gaussian” law is the one most commonly used … because it’s the simplest to manipulate.  But Gaussian laws have the unfortunate property of considering large price variations as events of minuscule probability… even though they are frequently observed in financial reality.  [Thus there is a competition to find the most realistic law…]  But the more frenetic the search for the “right hypothesis” becomes, the more one loses sight of the essential point…:  the belief that one will someday find the “right probability density” amounts to the belief that there are natural laws of finance.  This belief can be given the name of “objective probabilism” because it presupposes that there objectively exists a certain law of probability — “we’ll find it in the end” — that governs the price of assets.

Lordon finds more credible an “alternative approach,” which he associates with the name of André Orléan, according to which

“the” probability density doesn’t fall from the sky of “objective natures” but is rather the endogenous product of the interaction of financial operatives.  … It’s the radical modification of the configuration of interactions between operatives, expressed notably by the brutal variation of the degree of heterogeneity (or homogeneity) of behaviors, that produces the regime shift, and the qualitative transformation of the relevant probability density.

Students of dynamical systems will recognize the similarity to the language of René Thom’s catastrophe theory.  Lordon continues:

If one is absolutely set on maintaining the notion of law to describe the phenomena of finance — and the observation can be extended to all the phenomena of economics — one must bear in mind that the laws in question are not natural and invariant but rather temporary, variable, and contingent.   If one wishes, one can therefore preserve the general probabilistic framework but only after amending it substantially… where quantitative finance believes firmly in an objective probabilism, what one could even call a transcendent probabilism, there is in reality only an immanent probabilism:  the laws of probability do not fall to earth from a heaven of ideas, they emerge from below, shaped by the concrete interactions of agents — another way to rediscover that God doesn’t exist.

The last few words notwithstanding, here we see Lordon on the road to Spinozism.  We will not follow him there, but rather draw the conclusion that, if “There is no alternative,” the formula associated with Margaret Thatcher, it’s because the decision-makers, the Powerful Beings, as they are called in MWA, have contrived to make alternatives impossible.  It’s certainly not because alternatives are mathematically unthinkable.

 

Would Ted Cruz have been good for mathematics?

 

Renaissance

A dilemma’s “outer horn,” in the language of infinity-categories

James Simons — differential geometer, founder of the hedge fund Renaissance Technologies, and co-founder of the Simons Foundation — has been called “reclusive” and “highly secretive” but his name was in the news the other day.  MWA states (almost) explicitly that the Simons Foundation’s support has been unequivocally beneficial for mathematics, and this explains the red arrow on the right of the above diagram.  From p. 105:

Simons is  clearly as concerned as any mathematician, physicist, or biologist about the  internal goods of their respective fields.  His foundation bases its decisions on  the advice of those within the fields who share these concerns.

and more generally, speaking of Simons as well as the Clay Mathematical Institute and the American Institute of Mathematics:

Whatever can be said about the sources of their generosity, the immediate  effects of this kind of philanthropy on mathematics have been uniformly  positive.

The “source” of the Simons Foundation’s “generosity” in the application of mathematics to finance is subjected to some scrutiny in MWA, but the broader point being made in these pages is rather this one:

The  deeper  irony  is  that  the  (ostensibly)  democratically-based  social  institutions  of  government  are  perceived  as  less  sympathetic  to  the   “internal  goods”  of  mathematical  practice  than  the  structures  of   megaloprepeia  endowed  by  Powerful  Beings  like  Clay,  AIM,  or  Simons.

Now we can read in the Guardian that Simons earned $1,700,000,000 (approximately) in 2015 and that he is

the 50th richest person in the world, according to Forbes. His earnings last year were so large that if he were a country it would rate as the world’s 178th most productive nation, according to the World Bank’s GDP rankings.

No surprise there; but consider the Guardian‘s claim that Simons, along with fellow billionaire Kenneth Griffin of Citadel, “poured a lot of money into the presidential race, but both backed Republicans who dropped out.”  Specifically, Griffin

 in 2012 … described himself as a “Reagan Republican” and said he thought the rich had “insufficient influence” on the political process.

Renaissance, meanwhile,

which is run from the tiny Long Island village of Setauket where Simons owns a huge beachfront compound, has donated $13m to Cruz’s failed campaign. With Cruz out of the race, Renaissance has switched donations to Hillary Clinton, with more than $2m donated so far. Euclidean Capital, Simon’s family office, has donated more than $7m to Clinton.

This explains the red arrow on the left of the diagram.   The Guardian article added that Simons “has donated millions of dollars to maths and science education via the Simons Foundation he set up in 1994,” which suggests, perhaps erroneously, an isomorphism between the two terms at the top of the diagram.  If the left-hand arrow were a weak equivalence, we would then be able to give an affirmative answer to the question in today’s title.  However, the article asserts that Renaissance is good for Cruz, not the other way around; and the first thing one learns about ∞-categories is to make the distinction between inner horns, which can be completed to simplices, and outer horns, like the one in the diagram, which (in general) cannot.

Homotopy-theoretic considerations aside, I find it prima facie implausible that Renaissance, not to mention Simons, would have supported Ted Cruz.  Unlike Cruz, the Simons Foundation is concerned about climate change; unlike Cruz (or at least his father), the Simons Foundation believes in evolution.  So what’s going on?